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High-Efficiency Equipment Rebates for the Early Replacement of Natural Gas, Oil and Propane Heating Systems

June 23, 2017

MassSave

High-Efficiency Equipment Rebates for the Early Replacement of Natural Gas, Oil and Propane Heating Systems

Fuel Type Equipment Rebate Amount Efficiency Requirements Minimum Age
Oil Furnace w/ECM blower $750 AFUE ≥ 86% At least 12 years old
Forced hot water boiler $1,700 AFUE ≥ 86% At least 30 years old
Steam boiler $1,900 AFUE ≥ 84% At least 30 years old
Propane Furnace w/ECM blower $1,000 AFUE ≥ 95% At least 12 years old
Forced hot water boiler $3,000 Owner occupied – AFUE ≥ 90% At least 30 years old
Forced hot water boiler $3,500 Non-owner occupied* – AFUE ≥ 90% At least 30 years old
Steam boiler $1,900 AFUE ≥ 82% At least 30 years old
Natural Gas Furnace w/ECM blower $1,000 AFUE ≥ 95% At least 12 years old
Forced hot water boiler $3,000 Owner occupied – AFUE ≥ 90% At least 30 years old
Forced hot water boiler $3,500 Non-owner occupied* – AFUE ≥ 90% At least 30 years old
Steam boiler $1,900 AFUE ≥ 82% At least 30 years old

*Proof of permanent residence is required
ECM = Electronically Commutated Motor
AFUE = Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency rating
SEER = Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio
EER = Energy Efficiency Ratio
HSPF = Heating Seasonal Performance Factor

 

High-Efficiency Equipment Rebates for the Early Replacement of Central AC and Air Source Heat Pump Systems

Fuel Type Equipment Rebate Amount Efficiency Requirements Minimum Age
Electric Central A/C $750 SEER ≥ 16, EER ≥ 13 At least 12 years old
Central heat pump $750 SEER ≥ 16, HSPF ≥ 8.5 At least 12 years old
Central heat pump $1,000 SEER ≥ 18, HSPF ≥ 9.6 At least 12 years old

 

If your equipment does not meet the minimum age requirement or is non-functional, you may still qualify for our standard rebates up to $1,600:

  • Natural gas boiler or furnace
  • Oil boiler or furnace
  • Natural gas boiler or furnace
  • Natural gas boiler or furnace

 

How to Participate

  1. To see if you’re eligible for an early heating or cooling equipment replacement rebate, contact Mass Save at 866-527-SAVE (7283) to schedule your no-cost Mass Save Home Energy Assessment or Site Visit prior to removing your old equipment and installing your new efficient equipment.
    • If you are only interested in the early central A/C or central heat pump rebate, you may contact an Airflow and Charge Check (AC Check) Trained Contractor to verify eligibility.
    • Please note if you are interested in using the HEAT Loan to finance the new equipment, you must have a Home Energy Assessment.
  2. If your equipment is eligible for the early replacement rebate, you will receive the rebate form from your Energy Specialist or AC Check Trained Contractor. The new equipment must meet or exceed the efficiency requirements listed above.
  3. Rebates and other required documentation can be submitted online or by mail.

 

Rebate Eligibility Requirements

Natural Gas, Oil and Propane Heating Systems:
  • Fuel switching/conversion (i.e. oil to gas) is NOT eligible for this offer.
  • Distribution change/conversion (i.e. forced hot air to forced hot water) is NOT eligible for this offer.
  • Must be a Massachusetts residential natural gas or electric customer of Berkshire Gas, Blackstone Gas, Cape Light Compact, Columbia Gas of Massachusetts, Eversource, Liberty Utilities, National Grid or Unitil.
  • Municipal Electric customers must heat with natural gas provided by a participating Gas Utility.
  • Customer must complete a Mass Save Home Energy Assessment or Site Visit prior to replacing their heating equipment. The existing equipment must be functional and fueled by natural gas, propane, or oil. A boiler must be at least 30 years old, while a furnace must be at least 12 years old.
  • Qualifying equipment must be installed and completed Rebate Form and other required documentation must be submitted by the installation and submission deadlines.
  • Equipment must be installed within a 1–4 unit home.
  • Customers receiving the Early Heating Equipment Replacement Rebates are NOT eligible for any other Mass Save or GasNetworks heating and cooling equipment rebates on installed equipment; however, customers are eligible to apply for 0% financing through the Mass Save HEAT Loan Program.
  • Rebate is only valid for installations between January 1, 2017 and December 31, 2017. Rebate must be submitted by January 31, 2018.
  • Equipment installation may be subject to a verification inspection.

 

Central AC and Heat Pump Systems:
  • Must be a Massachusetts residential electric customer of Cape Light Compact, Eversource, National Grid or Unitil.
  • Municipal electric customers are not eligible.
  • Existing equipment must be verified by a Mass Save Home Energy Service Provider or AC Check trained contractor prior to replacement.
  • After choosing a contractor to perform the replacement, the contractor must ensure the new equipment is AHRI rated and meets minimum SEER/EER/HSPF ratings.
  • Rebate is only valid for installations between January 1, 2017 and December 31, 2017. Rebate must be submitted by January 31, 2018.
  • Equipment installation may be subject to a verification inspection.
  • Cannot be combined with other Mass Save Heating and Cooling Rebates for the same equipment.

7 Tips To Clean Bathroom Tiles

June 9, 2017

It’s likely that in some area of your bathroom, you have tile. Due to its durability, tile is a great choice for the look and function of the bathroom. If you’ve chosen the right tile for your bathroom, it should be able to withstand water, look great and able to tolerate cleaning.

As people use the bathroom, buildup and mildew can be frequent occurrences. In some areas with hard water, you may find scale deposits as well. But with a regular bathroom tile cleaning routine, you can keep the room looking new every time. Here are a few tips to keep your bathroom tile clean.

Bathroom Floor Tile

Tile Cleaning Costs

Depending on the amount of maintenance your bathroom tile needs could determine your budget. The average cost to clean tile and grout is $407 with most homeowners spending between $302 and $447. To bring back the fresh look of your tile, you may consider steam cleaning your tile floors. This can be done by a pro annually. Apart from that, your regular routine should be significantly cheaper, especially if you’re using natural, homemade solutions.

1. Use A Natural Solution

My go-to when cleaning is always to use natural options. For my and my family’s health, as well as our budget, it’s worth it! For cleaning bathroom tiles, vinegar and water is the solution I choose. Evenly mix one part vinegar to one part water in a spray bottle or bucket. Apply to the area you wish to clean and wipe with a cloth. This is a great natural tile cleaning solution to use in your regular routine.

Bathroom Shower Tile

2. Create A Scrub

Occasionally on shower tile walls or floors, you may find soap and scum buildup. You may need something a bit tougher than a spray solution. It’s easy to keep a DIY tile cleaning scrub on hand for when you need to spot clean your bathroom tile. Mix one part baking soda with half part salt and a half cup of washing soda. Store in a sealed container. When you have a specific spot you need to clean, spray water over the area to form a paste and sprinkle on the mixture. Scrub with a cloth to remove the buildup. For extra power, try soaking in vinegar instead of water.

3. Use Q-Tips

Don’t let those tricky corners and hard to reach spots in your bathroom tile flooring or walls go unnoticed. A simple trick for cleaning these spots is simply using a Q-tip. Use a bit of your tile cleaning solution to wet the top and you’re now able to clean in detail.

Mold And Mildew On Tile

4. Clean The Grout

For anyone cleaning bathroom tile, the chore doesn’t end with just that. Forgetting to clean your grout can easily make all your cleaning efforts go to waste. You can clean grout by making a paste of baking soda and water, putting it over the grout. Let it sit over the grout for five minutes then use a spray bottle full of vinegar to create the stain-fighting reaction. Scrub using a grout cleaning brush, found at most local convenience stores.

5. Protect From Mold & Mildew

One of the best ways to keep tile clean is to prevent it from getting dirty. Mold and mildew can be the biggest enemies when it comes to keeping tile clean. For this reason, it’s important your bathroom is properly ventilated. While cracking a window when showering can help, it’s not exactly ideal in cold winter months. Consider a bathroom fan installation.

Clean Your Grout

6. Use A Daily Spray

As much as you have a weekly routine, a daily spray may help you combat dirty shower tiles. Make this a habit to make bathroom tile cleaning an easier chore. There are many products that do a great job of this and make it easier to commit to a habit. If you prefer the natural alternatives, try two parts water, one part vinegar and one part rubbing alcohol. Give it an extra boost with a few drops of lemon or orange essential oil.

7. Dry Tile After Use

Another habit that can help your cleaning efforts is remembering to dry your tile when you’re done in the bathroom. Mold and mildew are more likely to thrive in areas that are continually damp. Use bathroom rugs to protect your tile floor and wipe up any excess water that may come from using the shower or sink. Invest in a squeegee to keep in your shower and remember to use after use. It’s these simple steps that can result in an overall cleaner bathroom.

Clean Tile Daily

Conclusion

Cleaning your bathroom tile doesn’t have to be a challenge. There are plenty of remedies you can find in your own home to help. Create a schedule incorporating the smaller habits you can form and the deeper cleans that can lead to a better bathroom.

Tankless Hot Water Heater: Should I or Shouldn’t I?

June 5, 2017

Tankless Water Heaters

Photo: rinnai.com

Whether you are building a new home or retrofiiting an older one (like me), take time to evaluate the hot water system. After all, estimates say that as much as 30% of a home’s energy budget is consumed by heating water.

My new “old house” came complete with an old and rusted gas-fueled tank-style water heater in the attic that was dying… well, dead. The question was not “should it be replaced?” but rather, “should it be replaced with a similar model or a new tankless system?”

A traditional water heater continuously heats water in the tank, regardless of whether it is being used. By comparison, the newer tankless designs heat water only when there is demand for it. Less stored water to heat means less cost—and let’s not forget, a more compact, wall-mounted design.

I did some research on water heating in general and tankless hot water heaters specifically, and here is what I learned:

Size Matters: Tankless hot water heaters are available in room or whole-house sizes. Calculate how many appliances or fixtures need hot water in order to determine the best size unit for your home. For me, a whole-house system was needed.

Gas-Operated Tankless Water Heater Diagram

Gas-operated tankless hot water heater diagram.

Fuel Type: Hot water heaters are available in either electric or gas (natural and propane) models. If you are considering electric, check for voltage and amperage requirements. The gas version will need some electric to operate, but venting will be the bigger issue.

Location: If you live further north, your ground water will be colder than if you reside in the southern or western part of the country. The temperature of the water will affect the speed and flow.

Know the Flow: If you think you will need to run the dishwasher while someone else is showering, assume a larger gallons-per-minute (GPM) rate will be on order to meet your overall water needs. Take into account water usage, too: A bathroom needs less water than a kitchen, a dishwasher less than a shower, and so on.

Look into Rebates: Many utility companies offer incentives, and you may benefit from state tax credits as well. Investigate both to ensure that you’re eligible and if so, that you reap the full benefits.

Understand the Payback: In general, a tankless hot water heater will cost you more upfront—between $800 to $1,150 (plus installation)—compared to a traditional tank water heaters at $450 to $750 (plus installation).

Balance the cost of your unit with your ongoing operating costs. According to the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy website, tankless water heaters can be 24 to 34 percent more efficient than a traditional tank-style water heater, depending on a home’s daily demand for hot water.

Ready to make the switch?  Contact us today!

Jim Lavallee Plumbing
Serving Eastern Massachusetts and the Boston area
Phone: Toll-free (888) 884-4122

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